Dogwood Anthracnose and its Spread in the South

In the 15 years since it was first reported in the United States, dogwood anthracnose (caused by Discula destructive sp. nov.) has spread rapidly and caused serious losses among flowering dogwoods (Cornus florida L.), particularly in the South. Infection begins in leaves and spreads to twigs and branches, which die back. Main-stem infections cause cankers, which kill the trees. In the South, infection is most likely at higher elevations and on moist to wet sites. Shade increases risk of infection and mortality. High-value trees can be protected by mulching, pruning, and watering during droughts, and applying a fungicide.

Walnut Anthracnose

Walnut antracnose, or leaf blotch as it is sometimes called, is a widespread and destructive disease of walnut species, particularly the eastern black walnut.

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